English Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel

English Springer Spaniel

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The English Springer Spaniel dog breed was developed as a hunting dog to catch game in the field, but they are also popular companions.

Athletic and versatile, they have been known to participate in agility, hunting trials, tracking, obedience trials and more, and they make great buddies to take with you when you go hiking or camping. It's hard to find a more affectionate furry family member, but this pup definitely needs room to run.

History

Spaniel dogs are thought to have originated in Spain - hence their name - many centuries ago and were probably brought to other parts of the world by the Romans or via trading ships. Spaniels were mentioned in Welsh law as early as 300 AD. That is over 1700 years ago!

Spaniels similar to today's English Springer Spaniel are depicted in 16th and 17th century works of art. Before firearms were invented, the spaniel was used to chase game birds or small animals by leaping at them and driving them out, so that they could be caught by hawks, hounds, or nets thrown over them. When firearms were invented in the 17th century, spaniels proved to be particularly adept at chasing away game for the archers.

In the 19th and early 20th centuries in England, dogs from the same litter were classified according to their hunting use and not their breed. Smaller dogs from a litter were used for hunting woodcock, and were therefore called Cockers. Larger pups from the same litter were used for flushing game and were called Springers.

Personality

English Springer Spaniels are smart and eager to please, not to mention enthusiastic. They are cheerful dogs and seem to have a good sense of humour. They usually get along well with children if they grow up with them from an early age, and they are affectionate toward their families. They also generally get along well with other pets, even small ones, but may consider birds as prey because that is what they are bred for. The typical Springer is friendly, eager to learn, quick-witted and obedient.